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Choosing between established and new schools

During the school admission process, parents must decide which academic setting their children will thrive in. They are faced with many options, from public to private schools in New York City (NYC), and everything in between. One issue that may arise during this search is each school’s history and reputation.

In NYC, some schools have been educating students since the 1700s, while others were established during the last few years. While parents’ school choice should not hinge on the year a school was founded, it may be a factor worth considering.

When parents are trying to find the best school for their children, it helps to review the materials available online and in brochures. Schools that have regularly held classes for decades are able to highlight data on their graduates, such as what colleges they went on to attend and the fields in which they work.

For example, certain NYC prep schools may have a long-standing reputation for providing the type of educational experience that many parents would like to see their children receive. Alumni data can offer a glimpse into the quality of a school’s services, such as how many former students gained entry into some of the country’s most prestigious colleges and universities.

While newer schools may still be developing their reputation, they may offer a more progressive take on learning that some parents will find appealing. In addition, faculty members and administrators at new schools will be eager to prove themselves and to incorporate new ideas in education. All ventures are fragile during their early stages and, as a result, educators in these settings will typically work hard to make a name for their school in a sea of established education providers.

Whether parents are looking into new or established schools, they should pay close attention to a school’s mission and the educational promises that school representatives make. At the end of the day, what matters more than the number of years a school has been around is that a child is placed in a school that will provide him or her with the education they require to thrive.